fastcodesign:

The Footwear Of The Future Looks Totally Gross
These shoes are 3-D printed, can regenerate on their own, and definitely resemble slime.
More> Co.Design

fastcodesign:

The Footwear Of The Future Looks Totally Gross

These shoes are 3-D printed, can regenerate on their own, and definitely resemble slime.

More> Co.Design

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

It’s that time of the month again (well, tomorrow at least), unleash the wolf in you and howl at the full moon!
Image (of a satyr really, but doesn’t it look like a wolfman?) from Conrad Gessner’s Historia animalium - Liber 1 (1602)

lookahere-at-this-book replied to your post: It’s that time of the month a…

Why does this satyr have chicken feet?

I was wondering this also, but workload trumped curiosity until you asked. We all know a satyr was a creature with the upper parts of a man but the legs and hindquarters of a goat, OR maybe it was just a funny looking man with a tail who liked to party, vis

(image from History of Ancient Pottery v.2 )
According to our learned colleagues at the National Library of Medicine, the “satyr” depicted in Gesner is “a creature said to have been caught in the woods outside Salzburg; it reportedly died a few days after capture.”
Which doesn’t actually answer the question of why Gesner included an image of this mystery beast instead of a perfectly normal satyr, though it does point out that perhaps 16th century Austrians* weren’t very good at coming up with new names for bizarre creatures they find in the woods.
NLM has a great full color version of Gesner, which includes descriptions in English of the page content (just click on the “T” in the upper left to get a description of each page.)
*yes, I know they weren’t Austrians yet, work with me here

smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

It’s that time of the month again (well, tomorrow at least), unleash the wolf in you and howl at the full moon!

Image (of a satyr really, but doesn’t it look like a wolfman?) from Conrad Gessner’s Historia animalium - Liber 1 (1602)

lookahere-at-this-book replied to your post: It’s that time of the month a…

Why does this satyr have chicken feet?

I was wondering this also, but workload trumped curiosity until you asked. We all know a satyr was a creature with the upper parts of a man but the legs and hindquarters of a goat, OR maybe it was just a funny looking man with a tail who liked to party, vis

(image from History of Ancient Pottery v.2 )

According to our learned colleagues at the National Library of Medicine, the “satyr” depicted in Gesner is “a creature said to have been caught in the woods outside Salzburg; it reportedly died a few days after capture.”

Which doesn’t actually answer the question of why Gesner included an image of this mystery beast instead of a perfectly normal satyr, though it does point out that perhaps 16th century Austrians* weren’t very good at coming up with new names for bizarre creatures they find in the woods.

NLM has a great full color version of Gesner, which includes descriptions in English of the page content (just click on the “T” in the upper left to get a description of each page.)

*yes, I know they weren’t Austrians yet, work with me here

appendixjournal:

"Medicine," a 1907 painting by Gustave Klimt that was destroyed during WWII and only survives in this black and white photograph.

appendixjournal:

"Medicine," a 1907 painting by Gustave Klimt that was destroyed during WWII and only survives in this black and white photograph.

smithsonianlibraries:

The aurora at the southern pole, in all its psychedelic glory. From v.14 of The Works of Jules Verne, this illustration is for his story The Sphinx of Ice, which starts on p. 263. (also known as An Antarctic Mystery.)

smithsonianlibraries:

The aurora at the southern pole, in all its psychedelic glory. From v.14 of The Works of Jules Verne, this illustration is for his story The Sphinx of Ice, which starts on p. 263. (also known as An Antarctic Mystery.)

laphamsquarterly:

smithsonianlibraries:

The ascent of Mrs. Graham with the Royal Victoria Balloon. August 9th, 1837. Now with movement! Relive that exciting time in air travel right here on our tumblr. From the second volume of William Upcott’s scrapbook of early aeronautica.

GIF ALL THE HISTORY!

laphamsquarterly:

smithsonianlibraries:

The ascent of Mrs. Graham with the Royal Victoria Balloon. August 9th, 1837. Now with movement! Relive that exciting time in air travel right here on our tumblr. From the second volume of William Upcott’s scrapbook of early aeronautica.

GIF ALL THE HISTORY!

pkzine:

Tessie and Jeff Andonuts

pkzine:

Tessie and Jeff Andonuts